We The People of Singapore

a digital initiative

promoting understanding and respect

for different religions in Singapore

We The People of Singapore is a digital initiative embarked by the IRO in partnership with Central Singapore Community Development Council, in support of the nation-wide SGSecure movement. Leveraging on the strength of social media, IRO aims to amplify its mission of promoting interfaith understanding. In line with this, the digital initiative, launched by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in August 2019, explores creative campaigns which promote awareness and respect for different religious beliefs and practices.

Your Religion in 60 Seconds

Dietary Restrictions in Buddhism and Islam

Ever wondered why religions have their dietary restrictions? Hear Venerable You Guang from Buddhist faith, and Imran Taib from Muslim faith have a 60 seconds chat about the concept of Halal and vegetarianism.

Religious Fasting in Hinduism and Baha’i Faith

Turns out, there’s more to fasting than not eating food! In the second episode of of Your Religion in 60 seconds, Swami Samachittananda from the Hindu faith and Lani Choo from Baha’i faith talk about religious fasting.

Special Days of the Week in Judaism and Christianity

Turns out, there’s more to fasting than not eating food! In the second episode of of Your Religion in 60 seconds, Swami Samachittananda from the Hindu faith and Lani Choo from Baha’i faith talk about religious fasting.

Faith in Singapore

Langar in Sikhism
Kolam in Hinduism

Ever wondered why the kolam patterns in front of Hindu homes are drawn with rice flour? The rice flour serves as food to the ants and birds around the house, extending this Hindu gesture of hospitality to everyone, including the tiniest of creatures.

Salat in Islam

Muslims place great importance on praying the five Salat on time every day, but do you know why? It is believed that reciting the same prayers at the same time as everyone else unites Allah’s faithful and sets a positive pattern for the day.

Langar in Sikhism

At the heart of the Sikh community is the langar, which is the gurdwara’s communal kitchen. Here, in a gesture of brotherhood towards all, Sikh volunteers cook together and serve free food to anyone who comes to the gurdwara. A tradition started by Guru Nanak, the langar is a beautiful example of how eating together brings people together, regardless of class or religion.

Meditation in Buddhism

Have you ever felt like your life seems to be spinning out of control? Buddhists believe there is one thing that’s completely in our hands, and that is our state of mind. That’s why they practise meditation at all times, whether at the temple or at home.

Ahimsa in Jainism

Did you know that some Jains choose to cover their mouths while they speak? This is to avoid bringing harm to the tiny organisms that are present in the air around the mouth. That’s right; the Jains’ firm belief in Ahimsa or Non-violence extends to every single aspect of their life, right from vegetarianism to measures taken to avoid harming even microscopic organisms.

Incense Burning in Taoism

Beyond being an integral part of Taoist worship, incense sticks also are a means of communing with deities and seeking the protection of the ancestors. By burning incense together at home or the temple, Taoists strengthen the bonds within the family and the community.

Good Friday in Christianity

On Good Friday, our Christian friends spend the day fasting and praying. Many also conduct prayerful processions commemorating Jesus’ suffering and his journey bearing the cross down the streets of Jerusalem towards his death. 

Chuppah in Judaism

An integral part of the Jewish wedding ceremony, the chuppah consists of square cloth, usually made of silk or velvet supported by four staves and held up by four men. A bride and groom stand together under a chuppah before an assembly to publicly proclaim that they are now bound together as man and wife and will live under one ro